Assessing Exposome Effects on Pregnancy through Urine Metabolomics of a Portuguese (Estarreja) Cohort
authors Gil, AM; Duarte, D; Pinto, J; Barros, AS
nationality International
journal JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH
author keywords environment; pollutants; exposome; in utero environment; pregnancy; metabolomics; nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; maternal urine
keywords ARSENIC EXPOSURE; HEALTHY PREGNANCY; METABOLISM; REVEALS; TOXICITY; MICE; RATS; PERTURBATIONS; SURVEILLANCE; MECHANISMS
abstract This nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics study compared the influence of two different central Portugal exposomes, one of which comprised an important source of pollutants (the Estarreja Chemical Complex, ECC), on the urinary metabolic trajectory of a cohort of healthy pregnant women (total n = 107). An exposome-independent description of pregnancy metabolism was found to comprise a set of 18 metabolites reflecting expected changes in branched-chain amino acid catabolism and hormone and lipid metabolisms. In addition, a set of small changes in some metabolites was suggested to be exposome-dependent and characteristic of pregnant subjects from the Estarreja region. These results suggested that the Estarreja exposome may impact to a very low extent pregnancy metabolism, inducing slight changes in amino acid metabolism (alanine, glycine, and 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, possibly involved in valine metabolism), tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (cis-aconitate), diet, or gut microflora (furoylglycine) as well as allantoin, 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, and an unassigned resonance at delta 8.45. Furthermore, the urine of Estarreja subjects was found to generally contain higher levels of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate and lower levels of citrate. However, out of the above metabolites, only glycine and citrate seemed to correlate with the proximity to the ECC, with slightly relative higher levels of these compounds found for subjects living closer to the ECC. This suggested possible small effects of local pollutants on energy metabolism, with the remaining exposome-dependent metabolite changes most probably originating from other aspects of the local exposome such as diet and lifestyle. Despite the limitation of this study regarding the unavailability of objective environmental parameters for the period under study, our results confirm the usefulness of metabolomics of human urine to gauge exposome effects on human health and, particularly, during pregnancy.
publisher AMER CHEMICAL SOC
issn 1535-3893
year published 2018
volume 17
issue 3
beginning page 1278
ending page 1289
digital object identifier (doi) 10.1021/acs.jproteome.7b00878
web of science category Biochemical Research Methods
subject category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
unique article identifier WOS:000426804300031
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