Intestinal Microbial and Metabolic Profiling of Mice Fed with High Glucose and High-Fructose Diets
authors Silva, JCP; Mota, M; Martins, FO; Nogueira, C; Goncalves, T; Carneiro, T; Pinto, J; Duarte, D; Barros, AS; Jones, JG; Gil, AM
nationality International
journal JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH
author keywords Fructose absorption; short-chain fatty acids; metabolic profiling; metabolomics; intestinal microbiota
keywords CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS; INSULIN-RESISTANCE; GUT MICROBIOTA; HEPATIC STEATOSIS; BARRIER FUNCTION; BILE-ACIDS; OBESITY; INFLAMMATION; RAT; QUANTIFICATION
abstract Increased sugar intake is implicated in Type-2 diabetes and fatty liver disease; however, the mechanisms through which glucose and fructose promote these conditions are unclear. We hypothesize that alterations in intestinal metabolite and microbiota profiles specific to each monosaccharide are involved. Two groups of six adult C57BL/6 mice were fed for 10-weeks with diets with glucose (G) or fructose (F) as sole carbohydrates, and a third group was fed with a normal chow carbohydrate mixture (N). Fecal metabolites were profiled by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and microbial composition by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Although N, G and F mice exhibited similar weight gains (with slight slower gains for F) and glucose tolerance, multivariate analysis of NMR data indicated that F mice were separated from N and G, with decreased butyrate and glutamate and increased fructose, succinate, taurine, tyrosine, and xylose. The different sugar diets also resulted in distinct intestinal microbiota profiles. That associated with fructose seemed to hold more potential to induce host metabolic disturbances compared to glucose, mainly by promoting bile acid deconjugation and taurine release and compromising intestinal barrier integrity. This may reflect the noted nonquantitative intestinal fructose absorption hence increasing its availability for microbial metabolism, a subject for further investigation.
publisher AMER CHEMICAL SOC
issn 1535-3893
year published 2018
volume 17
issue 8
beginning page 2880
ending page 2891
digital object identifier (doi) 10.1021/acs.jproteome.8b00354
web of science category Biochemical Research Methods
subject category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
unique article identifier WOS:000441112800030
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journal analysis (jcr 2017):
journal impact factor 3.950
5 year journal impact factor 4.033
category normalized journal impact factor percentile 82.911
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